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A who’s-who on all females in Greek mythology, with a section on Greek Men, a collection of myths, and a lot of beautiful images.

  • I planted strawberries today and had a religious experience. You should understand that in my life planting strawberries is an extreme rarity, whereas religious experiences occur almost hourly. Posts like this one will be even more uncommon, I’ll leave them…

  • I love it that we imagined descendants of Classical Civilizations continue to retell Greek myths. Xena was like my favorite show EVARRR and going with my fellow Classics majors in college to see Troy and laughing at all the wrong…

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  • There are two festival days in the ancient Greek lunar month of Thargelion (closest to the month of May) that celebrate spring cleaning. Will it surprise you that they are both celebrated by women? I am about to pick up…

  • Thanks to A. Venefica’s synchroblog, I now see the dual everywhere I go. So, I’m doing a second installment on the topic, this time about a more popular topic: toin theoin. That is, the two deities known to be Demeter…

  • Dear student, I am flattered that after looking at my site for maybe 45 seconds, you have decided that your paper would be improved by my help. Therefore, I try not to ignore you when you email me asking for…

  • Carol Christ (awesome spiritual eco-feminist author and blogger for Women and Spirituality) just posted on the death of a (Greek) neighbor of hers. (She’s living in Greece.) She says, My mind went immediately to the explanation of the Eleusinian Mysteries…

  • This is part of a synchroblog led by A. Venefica’s Weblog: Symbolic Meanings. See the end of the post for a list of other participants. I realize I am taking a risk of immediately losing your attention by starting off…

  • Apparently, this is becoming a monthly thing – I wonder who’ll take up the torch next month? So! A. Venefica over at Symbolic Meanings is the lead on this month’s synchroblog, and the topic is DUALITY. Here’s what she’s saying…

  • I went to Greece last year and it was amazing. I can’t tell you all about it – it would take too long – but I wanted to at least talk a little about Leto‘s tree. It was on the…

  • The idea that I want to work with in this post is the role that contemporary art – from incredibly detailed fantasy artists like Howard David Johnson and Vallejo and Bell to the, dare I say, feminist art of painters…

  • You may be thinking as you browse the various titles here, why so much sex? The seductive moonings of innocent young landowners 1, man-on-man lovin’2, slave-girl sex (consensual and not)3, cheating wives who murder their husbands and are subsequently killed…

  • It shouldn’t surprise you that vanity appears to have been around as we’ve had records. But what might surprise you is that, just as butts are part of the hotness requirements for women today, butts were also totally “big” back…

  • The author kindly shared a copy of this book (with accompanying CD performing a retelling of the myths included) with me for my review. It has taken a long time for me to find the appropriate space to do so.…

  • So in the U.S. (and lots of other places), we really dig the low-born (and occasionally low-brow) hero. Titanic and Shrek are good examples. But the ancient Greeks had a very different class structure than we do, and you’re really…

  • A lot of the important points about motherhood in ancient Greek myth are already made in the posts On Being a Virgin and Ge, Gaia, Gaie: Earth, but to summarize all that quickly, I will quote from Sue Blundell’s Women…

  • Inspired by a comment from Dan over at Xark, I decided that I should write an entry on underwear and ancient Greek myth. From time to time students ask me questions like, “What did Aphrodite wear?” I usually just refer…

  • Taking my cue from Between Old and New Moons, I want to suggest a synchroblog of my own. I would love to see all of the myth blogs get together to talk about Motherhood. And because my definition is sort…

  • So, in case it wasn’t terribly obvious, the whole “Sing, Goddess” thing comes from the first phrase found in so many ancient Greek hymns and even epic poems (like the Iliad). The idea is that the Muse/Goddess would be relating…

  • Really, I tell the whole thing in the Myth Pages, so I won’t retell it in the blog, but I felt I should at least mention it after that post on transgender myths. It could be seen in that light,…

  • One of the best ways to put your finger on how ancient Greece thought about what it meant to be a woman is to look at the fascinating myths where characters transition from one gender to another. There are a…

  • We still talk about Mother Earth. She’s a mom in a lot of religious traditions, not just that of the ancient Greeks, and it is also true that there are plenty of earth-related mother-affiliated goddesses in the Classical and pre-Classical…

  • Greek mythology is taught in public primary and secondary schools across the country. Although, personally, I quite enjoyed teaching my peers what I had memorized out of D’Aulaire’s Greek Myths (our 6th grade text book for the subject), and loved…

  • Yay! My new Gallery is up! I’m not sure how many images were in the last one but it was really tough for me to add new ones because of the funky code (did I mention that I don’t use…

  • The Theogamia was this ancient Greek festival celebrating, literally, the gods’ marriage. All the rituals took place in the temple of Hera, and the whole thing appeared to be in honor of the goddess in her role as Protectress of…

  • Okay, I give up. What do YOU want to read about in this blog? The only responses have been to the entries requesting your perspective on the donation thing (very helpful responses, by the way!), so now I am asking…

  • We are talking about Athena, Artemis, and Hestia here, folks: the Three Virgin Goddesses. At the risk of presenting a depressingly simplistic argument, I’m gonna do my best to give you a starting point for thinking about these things. Remember,…

  • In case you hadn’t noticed, I have written this site with a very intentional (and occasionally annoying) voice. It’s on purpose. It was written that way 1) so that you won’t get bored reading it, 2) so I won’t get…

  • So, there’s a brand new quiz to take. I admit, it’s all female monsters, but then, this is a site for women in Greek myths … I would love feedback on the quizzes. Do you like them? Do you want…

  • You may or may not have noticed, but paleothea.com is a not for profit website. That means, I don’t get any money from ANYONE. I don’t take ads out for google, I don’t get kickbacks for telling you to buy…

  • http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/the_tls/article2581303.ece That is the link to a review of Joan Breton Connelly’s newest book, Portrait of a Priestess. I’ll tell you one thing, it’s on MY Amazon.com wishlist! I haven’t read it yet, so I can’t review it myself, but…

  • Reading Constructing Panic, by Capps and Ochs, has reminded me of a crucial part of my discovery of the power of narrative. In discussing the impossibility of a definitive or “real story” – in other words, every event can be…